Monthly Archives: August 2014

Lowell2020 Endorses Charlie Baker for Governor

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Charlie Baker

Lowell2020 is pleased to endorse Republican Charlie Baker for Governor of Massachusetts. The primary is September 9.

Charlie Baker, former CEO of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, wants to increase local aid, doesn’t support in-state tuition for illegal immigrants, and wants to develop a more significant relationship with Canadian Hydro who makes renewable energy products including the Francis Turbine (named after the turbine developed by James B. Francis in Lowell!).

He’s against the Kinder Morgan Keystone XL pipeline as proposed, but will consider bringing natural gas into Massachusetts to supplement the state’s energy needs along routes already existing, and not through people’s yards.

Baker’s priority is growing the economy by developing a strategy of jobs creation. At last weeks debate at Middlesex Community College in Lowell, he said that this is the most important issue in the race. He’s right. Baker outlined a strategy that includes government deregulation and tax reductions.

But the meat of his proposed jobs creation initiative is in the “how”, not the “what”. Baker proposes that the state tap the intellectual capital of the colleges and universities, citing Northeastern University’s coop program as a means to that end. Baker considers Northeastern’s work-study program a viable model for other colleges in the Commonwealth to emulate.

He also recommends that the state’s community colleges become workforce training centers. His support of collegiate “on the job training” would add structural foundation to plans already being implemented by UMass Lowell and Middlesex Community College. Baker’s support would add synergy to current & future collaborations and initiatives in Lowell.

With Charlie Baker as Governor, Lowell can come to the forefront as a model enterprise zone and gateway city in Massachusetts, while building on the city’s potential towards becoming a credible global city. But for this to happen in earnest, the City must decide on its vision for downtown Lowell, and, deliver the best setting for the education and recreation of its high school students (Cawley Campus).

George DeLuca
ComeToLowell.com

The Raytheon-UMass Lowell Research Institute (RURI)

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Mark & Elisia Saab Emerging Technologies and Innovation Center (ETIC)

On August 12, Raytheon Company and the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML) “announced an agreement to establish a joint research facility focused on the advancement of innovative technologies in a collaborative, state-of-the-art institute.” Raytheon is committing up to $5 million over the next 10 years to establish the new research facility dubbed The Raytheon-UMass Lowell Research Institute (RURI).

The new research center will occupy the top floor of the new Mark & Elisia Saab Emerging Technologies and Innovation Center (ETIC) at UML’s North Campus. The ETIC is the $80 million, 84,000 SF, research facility which opened on October 11, 2012. Two top Raytheon officials attended the grand opening, a testament to the depth of UMass Chancellor Marty Meehan’s vision and laser focus.

“We look forward to bringing the expertise of our top-notch faculty together with researchers from Raytheon. This new partnership is just one example of how UMass Lowell is leading the way in collaborating with industry to power innovation and the economy in Massachusetts and beyond,” said Chancellor Meehan. “This institute will also provide our students with the kind of real-world experience that is one of the hallmarks of a UMass Lowell education.”

“As a co-directed, co-located research environment, the RURI signifies a unique opportunity for Raytheon’s university partnerships,” said Mark E. Russell, Raytheon vice president of Engineering, Technology and Mission Assurance. “The RURI will serve as an extension of our current research capabilities and represents a resource across the Raytheon enterprise for the study of advanced materials and flexible circuit technologies, such as printable electronics and nanotechnology.”

UML continues to roll out a credible workforce development strategy after announcing expansion plans for their M2D2 program and leasing prime additional space at 110 Canal St. The M2D2 program is incubating medical device companies, some of which expect to reach their funding goals of anywhere between $10 million and $50 million a year by 2017-2022. Middlesex Community College (MCC) is right in sync with its own STEM Career Exploration initiative. In March, MCC announced a $3 million capital grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC) to build a new biotechnology facility on Middle Street.

MCC's Talbot Building on Middle Street in Lowell, MA

MCC’s Talbot Building on Middle Street in Lowell, MA

MCC’s new facility will be located on the fifth floor of the Talbot Science Building on Middle Street. The 10k SF space will include a lecture room, laboratory, clean room, gowning area, and prep room. The facility “will significantly expand the capacity of MCC to prepare its students in the best possible way to meet the workforce needs of the life-sciences industry.”

And that’s not all. The City Council approved a tax-increment financing agreement (TIF) to make way for Metigraphics move to 1001 Pawtucket Blvd. Metigraphics specializes in designing, prototyping, and mass production of micron-scale components. Sounds a little like nano-technology. As noted in an Aug. 18 Lowell Sun editorial, Metigraphics is excited to be near UMass Lowell and its innovations initiatives.

John Power, CEO of Farley-White, the company that owns 1001 Pawtucket Blvd. and, Wannalancit MIlls (the current M2D2 site), noted last October that 500,000 SF of business expansion space is needed in downtown Lowell. Hopefully, the City is listening. The dynamic synergy of these partnerships and the spirit of collaboration that continues to build signifies Lowell’s steady emergence as a Global City.

George DeLuca
ComeToLowell.com